PhD scholar Vamsi Tall and colleagues at the Sensor Systems Lab at the University of Washington in Seattle have developed a new system to power the devices using the Wi-Fi signals.  Researchers used a custom built camera module and powered it with the ambient Wi-Fi signals, the research has been called as PoWiFi or PowerWifi.

Ever felt the need of charging your gadgets using Wi-Fi? Not the need, but most of us might have wished for that. Wouldn’t it be cool that your device will not need any kind of alternate power source.  Ever felt the need of charging your gadgets using Wi-Fi? Not the need, but most of us might have wished for that. Wouldn’t it be nice that your device will not need any kind of alternate power source or battery? Just roam around using your device without caring about the amount of juice left.

Researchers have managed to develop such technology and named it as Power Wi-Fi or PoWi-Fi.  It will allow the power to be transmitted wirelessly using the current Wi-Fi substructure. The researchers have managed to develop a camera which gets its power from Wi-Fi, entirely.

It is indicating to a future where batteries would become superfluous. The research is still at its early stages and researchers believe that this could bring revolution in connecting the devices that are part of Internet of Things. The potential of Internet of Things could be vast if there was a way to power copious little machines.

We have managed to develop robots as small as an insect. We could go further, but one of the major restriction is the source of power. If you will make a robot smaller, you will have less space for stuffing a power source inside it. With this research, we can go further without giving a caring about the spaces that are required to stuff the power source.

The experiments were first determined when the researches realized that the Wi-Fi signals have the energy closer to the power required by numerous of low-power devices. But soon, the researchers realized that as the Wi-Fi signals are sent in rupture across multiple frequencies, power was transferred too scarcely to be of any use.

To sort this out, they adjusted the routers to send noise when a broadcast channel was idle. This made the signal constant, providing relatively more power. The addition of this noise, however, caused very negligible change in the data-transmission rate across Wi-Fi network.

The experimental camera managed to take two pictures in almost an hour. Note that the research is still in its very early stage and is full of potentials, because the next big thing is going to be Internet of Things or battery? Just roam around using your device without caring about the amount of juice left.